The Golden Hits: One Very Old Song Four Different Singers. Who Sang It Better?

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Cover versions of well-known, well-liked tunes are often recorded by new or up-and-coming artists

to achieve initial success when their unfamiliar original material would be less likely to be successful. Cover versions are also released as an effort to revive the song’s popularity among younger generations of listeners after the popularity of the original version has long since declined over the years.

Moody Scott – Groovin Out On Life
Moody began his singing career at an early age. Like many of the youth of his era, he grew up listening to R&B, Soul and Blues artists such as Sam Cooke, Otis Redding, Al Green, Little Milton, Tyrone Davis, Bobby “Blue” Bland and B.B. King. Like Sam Cooke and Al Green, Moody’s first musical interest was church music, and at age 12 he became lead vocalist for the Gospel group The Starlights.

 

The Newbeats Groovin’ out on life
The Newbeats were an American popular music vocal trio, led by Larry Henley, best known for their 1964 hit, “Bread and Butter”, which was released on the Hickory Records label. “Bread and Butter” was the group’s first hit. Written by Larry Parks and Jay Turnbow, the record reached #2 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. It sold over one million copies in the U.S.

 

ken parker-groovin out of life
Parker began by singing in church, where his father was a preacher. He formed a group called the Blues Benders in the mid-1960s, and their first recording was “Honeymoon by the Sea”. The group arranged to audition for Coxsone Dodd, but due to a misunderstanding, Parker was the only member to turn up, so he auditioned as a soloist, impressing Dodd sufficiently to launch his solo career.

groovin’ (out on life) Nolan Porter
Nolan Frederick Porter (born 1949 in Los Angeles) is an American R&B singer and songwriter who recorded two albums and six singles in the early 1970s. His best known song is “Keep On Keeping On”, a northern soul track popularized in 1978 by the Manchester and Salford band Joy Division.

 

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22 thoughts on “The Golden Hits: One Very Old Song Four Different Singers. Who Sang It Better?

  1. I love these songs. Wish there were groups who will sing these songs again.Nolan porter version is the cheesiest but for some strange reason I like it.

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  2. I got to admit the mid 50’s and 60’s was the best decades for music compared to today, Man why can’t the whole world go back to the old days? No rap,good foods,best cartoons and just be nonchalant all day?

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  3. I love all old music😀😀😎 but I feel like I prefer the ken parker singing it in reggae over all the other three. Wish it was a bit clearer though. I really really love reggae anything in reggae puts me in a nice vibe.

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  4. My parents have loads of these!! i will show my kids this music and I’m a 1990s baby, I swear this kind of music never gets old no matter what.

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  5. The Music of the Fifties (rocks and ballads) got to join in the same melody romance and fun. Rock and Roll and Ballads of the Fifities are still the best rock made until today. its between parker and newbeats.

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  6. There will never be any comparison to any of the artists of this time. They COULD sing. listening to these with my two youths. Love them all. I do not allow my children to listen to lewd contents when they leave my roof thats another kettle of fish.

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  7. This brings me back to the good old days I love it!We were so lucky to have all these ‘Oldies!!’ the moody and ken parker doing it for me ok I LOVE all of them!!

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  8. Sorry if I sound too cruel but nolan porter sing like an opera lady. Eventhough he might be a good singer his type of singing did not go well with the song. The way he delivered his version made me chuckle a bit.

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  9. I keep playing repeat on the moody guy, he is funky cool and he sound way different and more experience. He put his own spin on it and his voice is lovely.

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